Prescription Medication Addiction

What are Prescription Medications?

Prescription medication (prescription medicine) is a pharmaceutical drug that legally requires a medical prescription to be dispensed. Many prescribed medications have become household names. They are widely available and don’t carry the same stigma associated with illicit drug use. More than 50,000 individuals died in 2019 as a result of overdosing from Prescribed Medications.[1]

Signs of Prescription Drug Addiction:

  • Hostility
  • Irritability 
  • Taking More Than Prescribed
  • Appearing Intoxicated 
  • Overly Energetic
  • Lethargic
  • Change in Sleeping and Eating Patterns
  • Mood Swings 
  • Visiting Multiple Doctors (Doctor Shopping)
  • “Borrowing” and/or “Losing” Prescribed Medicines
  • Using Prescriptions at a Faster Rate Than Prescribed
  • Crushing or Breaking Pills
  • Lying About Amount of Medication Used
  • Stashing Medication in Multiple Places 
  • Stealing or Forging Prescriptions

There are many different classes of prescription medication; Opioid, Anti-Depressant, Benzodiazepine, Sedative, Stimulant and Hypnotic to name a few. 

Commonly Abused Medications:

  • OxyContin
  • Xanax
  • Valium
  • Percocet
  • Lortab
  • Ambien
  • Adderall
  • Vyvanse
  • Ritalin
  • Norco
  • Promethazine
  • Robitussin
  • Klonopin
  • Seroquel
  • Wellbutrin
  • Vicodin
  • Opana
  • Trazodone
  • Soma
  • Gabapentin
  • Phenobarbital 
  • Hydrocodone

Because of the varying classes, these drugs produce different effects. For medication specific side-effects, please consult a physician or review your prescription information. 

Long-Term Side-Effects Of Prescription Drug Abuse:

  • Liver Failure 
  • Kidney Damage 
  • Respiratory Failure
  • Chronic Insomnia 
  • Nausea
  • Stomach Irritation
  • Decreased Cognitive Function

Prescription Drug abuse is life-threatening. If you or a loved one are at risk, please fill out the form below for a free assessment. We recommend that at-risk individuals participate in our 30-90 day program to help achieve long term sobriety.

[1]https://www.drugabuse.gov/related-topics/trends-statistics/overdose-death-rates